Browse by Category
Graphic image for 9/11 foreknowledge
Graphic: unanswered questions
Graphic of paper shredder- destruction of evidence
Graphic: conflict of interest
Cui bono graphic
Alleged Hijacker graphic
9/11 Commission Shield

WTC responder spearheds three-way kidney transplant

CleanPrintBtn gray smallPdfBtn gray smallEmailBtn gray small

BY STACEY ALTHERR
stacey.altherr@newsday.com

August 30, 2007

In January, John Feal was ready to give his kidney to a perfect stranger. But
they weren’t a good match.

That bad news led to a series of events that will culminate this morning in
a Manhattan hospital and potentially save not one life, but three.

The daisy chain started by Feal includes six surgeons who will conduct three
simultaneous kidney transplants at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University
Medical Center.

Feal, 40, of Nesconset, said he will give his kidney to a recipient, whose
spouse will give a kidney to a second recipient, whose spouse will give a kidney
to Paul Grossfeld. Grossfeld, 56, from New Jersey, was the intended recipient
of Feal’s kidney, but Feal was a better match for someone else. So the chain,
called paired donation, was established.

“I feel great,” Feal said Wednesday. “I feel like I’ve been
training for a prizefight.”

There were 17,090 kidney transplants in the nation last year, according to
the National Kidney Foundation, which does not tally the number of paired donations.
But a foundation representative said that procedure is relatively new.

NewYork-Presbyterian confirmed the operations were scheduled to take place
but would not identify any of the patients, citing strict patient confidentiality
laws.

Feal heads the Fealgood Foundation, an organization that advocates for and
gives financial assistance to 9/11 responders and workers who have fallen ill
since working at Ground Zero.

Grossfeld, a former Queens resident, found Feal’s Web site last year while
desperately searching for a donor. A former volunteer paramedic in North Massapequa
who has suffered from kidney disease and diabetes for years, Grossfeld e-mail-
ed Feal to ask whether he could post an appeal for a kidney to Feal’s Web site.
He soon got a call back from Feal saying, “You got yourself a kidney.”

Grossfeld, appreciative of all Feal has done, said Wednesday, “It’s been
a rough road.”

“I’m ready, though,” Grossfeld said. “I’m taking my last dialysis
treatment right now.”

Feal, who was a consultant for Michael Moore’s health-care documentary film
“Sicko,” began his efforts because of his own pain. Seven days after
the terrorist attacks, Feal was working demolition at Ground Zero when an 8,000-pound
steel beam fell on his left foot. A former Army veteran, Feal made a tourniquet
out of his belt and yelled for help. Soon after treatment for the injury, gangrene
set in and he lost half his foot.

As he began to recover, he decided his calling was to help other 9/11 responders
and workers, including those with respiratory illnesses from working in the
toxic environment.

Feal said his gift of life to an anonymous recipient is his way to shed light
on all those responders and workers now in need of lung and kidney transplants
themselves.

“I’m committed to 9/11 issues,” said Feal, who cites a 9/11 worker
he knows who says he now needs a double-lung transplant. “The real reason
I’m doing this is to spread awareness of the needs of 9/11 responders. If people
on Long Island read this and sign their organ donor on their license, I’ve done
my job.”

Copyright © 2007, Newsday Inc.

Source URL: http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/ny-likidn0830,0,7486226.story?coll=ny_home_rail_headlines