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White House

The Undying Role of 9/11 Family Members in Calling for an Independent Inquiry into 9/11

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                            March 28, 2014

Media Relations/Interviews: media@ReThink911.ca

Press Release: The Undying Role of 9/11 Family Members in Calling for an Independent Inquiry into 9/11

Halifax, March 28, 2014 – Yesterday in Parliament Megan Leslie, NDP Deputy Leader and Halifax MP, was blasted by Conservative backbencher James Bezan for a community event that was posted by a constituent on her website.

Bezan was referring to the Halifax stop of a 17-city Canadian tour by architect Richard Gage, leader of 2100 architects and engineers who question the collapses of World Trade Center buildings 1, 2, and 7. Many people do not know that an investigation was resisted by the Bush administration, and that the building collapses were never scientifically investigated.

Following major disasters such as the Titanic, Pearl Harbor, the JFK assassination, and the Challenger tragedy, commissions of inquiry have been appointed within a few days.

In the case of 9/11 no such inquiry was ordered. It took more than 14 months for the Bush administration, under sustained pressure from the “Jersey Girls” (who lost their husbands in the attacks) and other families who were calling for an investigation into the evidence, to finally launch the 9/11 Commission.

Funded by a paltry $3 million and hampered by a short deadline, the government appointed – amidst considerable controversy – White House insider Philip Zelikow as Executive Director.

The resulting July 2004 9/11 Commission Report was labeled “whitewash” by Harper’s Magazine – “defrauding the nation.”

More than 300 statements… Continue reading

CIA admits to spying on Senate staffers

Originally published at The Guardian by Spencer Ackerman on 7/31/14

Image of CIA Director John Brennan

John Brennan

The director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John Brennan, issued an extraordinary apology to leaders of the US Senate intelligence committee on Thursday, conceding that the agency employees spied on committee staff and reversing months of furious and public denials.

Brennan acknowledged that an internal investigation had found agency security personnel transgressed a firewall set up on a CIA network, which allowed Senate committee investigators to review agency documents for their landmark inquiry into CIA torture.

Among other things, it was revealed that agency officials conducted keyword searches and email searches on committee staff while they used the network.

The admission brings Brennan’s already rocky tenure at the head of the CIA under renewed question. One senator on the panel said he had lost confidence in the director, although the White House indicated its support for a man who has been one of Barack Obama’s most trusted security aides.

CIA spokesman Dean Boyd acknowledged that agency staff had improperly monitored the computers of committee staff members, who were using a network the agency had set up, called RDINet. “Some CIA employees acted in a manner inconsistent with the common understanding reached between [the committee] and the CIA in 2009 regarding access to the RDINet,” he said.

Asked if Brennan had or would offer his resignation, a different CIA spokesman, Ryan Trapani, replied: “No.”

In March, the committee chairwoman, Senator Dianne Feinstein of California, accused the agency of violating… Continue reading

Obama: U.S. ‘crossed a line’ and tortured after 9/11 attacks

Originally published at CNN by Ray Sanchez on 8/3/14

(CNN) — President Barack Obama acknowledged Friday that the United States “crossed a line” and tortured al Qaeda detainees after the 9/11 terror attacks.

 

The comments at a White House news conference were the President’s strongest on the controversial subject since he came into office denouncing what he described as the Bush years of torturing alleged terrorists, also known as “enhanced interrogation.”

“When we engaged in some of these enhanced interrogation techniques, techniques that I believe and I think any fair-minded person would believe were torture, we crossed a line,” Obama said. “And that needs to be … understood and accepted. And we have to, as a country, take responsibility for that so that hopefully we don’t do it again in the future.”

In the remarks, Obama was referring to a soon-to-be-released Senate Intelligence Committee report detailing the CIA’s controversial interrogation and detention program following the 9/11 attacks.

Image of tortured Guananamo inmateThe document is a nearly 700 page summary of the full 6,800 page report that was approved a year and a half ago by a committee sharply divided along party lines.

Senators on the committee have said the report is critical of the CIA’s treatment of terrorism suspects, saying it amounted to torture — an allegation CIA officials have denied. It also finds that those harsh interrogation techniques did not help disrupt future terrorist attacks as many in intelligence community have claimed.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein said later Friday that the report’s public… Continue reading