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New Articles at the Journal of 9/11 Studies

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At the Journal of 9/11 Studies, we have published two new articles. The first is from Dr. Timothy Eastman and professional engineer Jonathan Cole. It is titled “WTC Destruction: An Analysis of Peer Reviewed Technical Literature.” Here’s the abstract:

“The importance of understanding the mechanisms of collapse for the three World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001 cannot be over-estimated, for these unusual collapses and their disputed causes raise questions regarding all future steel-frame building design. A literature review was conducted to identify the evolving trend in research results in this area, which have become increasingly diverse over time. Recommendations for further research are presented.”

The second article is from German researcher Paul Schreyer. It is called “Radar loss on 9/11.” Here’s an excerpt:

“The radar coverage of the United States airspace is nearly complete. In particular the northeastern area, where all four hijackings took place on 9/11, has no “gaps” whatsoever in radar coverage. Nonetheless there was radar loss on 9/11 with respect to the third hijacked plane, American Airlines Flight 77, which was reported to have hit the Pentagon.”

Also of interest is a letter from earlier this month by Professor Lance de-Haven Smith. The letter is titled “Conspiracy Denial in the U.S. Media.” Here’s an excerpt:

“Many American journalists appear to be locked into a peculiar way of thinking that makes them blind to signs of political criminality in high office. This mindset is characterized by an apparent inability to differentiate groundless accusations of elite political intrigue from legitimate concerns about the integrity of U.S. political leaders and institutions. For some reason, when it comes to popular suspicions of schemes involving the nation’s political elites, many journalists in the United State make no distinctions. They categorize all such suspicions as ‘conspiracy theories,’ which they assume are not only untrue, but wacky and paranoid.”

Professor de-Haven Smith’s new book is available at Amazon: Conspiracy Theory in America.

By Kevin Ryan
Journal of 9/11 Studies