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Lingering Health Problems and Death for 9/11 Rescue Workers, Survivors

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Problems mount from 9/11 fallout

By David Shukman

BBC News science correspondent

April 12, 2006

URL: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/sci/tech/4904188.stm

See the dust clouds

The number of people with medical problems linked to the 9/11 attacks
on New York has risen to at least 15,000.

The figure, put together for the BBC, counts those receiving treatment for
problems related to breathing in dust.

Many of the victims say the government offered false reassurances that the
Manhattan air was safe and are now pursuing a class-action lawsuit.

On Tuesday, a coroner said the death of a policeman who developed a respiratory
disease was “directly linked” to 9/11.

James Zadroga – who worked at Ground Zero – died in January. The New Jersey
coroner’s ruling was the first of its kind.

WTC ‘cough’

Jeff Endean used to be the macho leader of a police Swat firearms team. Now,
he has trouble breathing and survives on the cocktail of drugs he takes every
day.

Kelly Colangelo, an IT specialist, used to have good health but now endures
a range of problems including asthma and sinus pain.

“It worried me that I’ve been damaging my health just being in my home,” she told the BBC News website. “It also worries me that I see the health
impact on the [the emergency crews at the scene]. We were also exposed and I
wonder if in 10-15 years from now, am I going to be another victim?”

Both are victims of what used to be called “World Trade Center cough”,
an innocuous sounding condition that many thought would pass once the dust that
rose from the attacks of 9/11 had blown away.

But the medical problems have not merely intensified; the list of victims has
grown alarmingly at the same time.

The apparent cause? The long line of contaminants carried by the dust into
the lungs of many of those at, or near, the scene on that fateful day.

‘Real’ figure

One list of sufferers has been compiled at the Mount Sinai Medical Center.
Its World Trade Center Screening Programme has 16,000 people on its books, of
whom about half – 8,000 – require treatment.

A further 7,000 firefighters are recorded as having a wide range of medical
problems, producing a total of 15,000. But the overall numbers affected could
easily be far higher.

As the US government’s newly appointed “health czar” John Howard
confirmed to the BBC, there were between 30,000 and 50,000 people at or near
Ground Zero who might have been exposed to the hazardous dust and no one really
knows how many are suffering problems now.

Consisting of billions of microscopic particles, the dust was especially toxic
because of its contents.

A grim list includes lead from 50,000 computers, asbestos from the twin towers’
structures and dangerously high levels of alkalinity from the concrete.

Long time

Many of the people now suffering were sent to Ground Zero to help search for
survivors. Others volunteered. Still more just happened to be living or working
in the area.

The latter feel particularly aggrieved, even betrayed.

In the days following the attacks, the head of the US Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) declared that monitoring operations had proved the “air was
safe to breathe”. And with that reassurance, the authorities reopened the
globally important financial hub of Wall Street.

At the time it was seen as a critical morale-booster to a wounded nation.

Yet now the federal courts have allowed a class-action lawsuit to be filed
against those very authorities.

Last month, a judge described the EPA’s reassurances as “misleading” and “shocking the conscience”. The legal process could last years.

A special report on the dust fallout from the 9/11 attacks will be featured
on BBC World starting on Wednesday 3 May at 1930 GMT. The documentary will also
be carried on BBC News 24.

(c) BBC MMVI


Health problems linger for most 9/11 escapees

World Trade Center registry tracking respiratory and psychological issues

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12211725/

April 7, 2006

NEW YORK – A majority of survivors of the 2001 attacks that destroyed the World
Trade Center suffered from respiratory ailments and depression, anxiety and
other psychological problems up to three years later, federal health officials
said Friday.

The people who escaped from collapsed or damaged buildings on Sept. 11, 2001,
were several times as likely to suffer from breathing problems or psychological
trauma if they were caught in the cloud of trade center dust and debris that
covered lower Manhattan, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention said.

“The trauma of being caught in the cloud itself, the whole experience
had an impact on their … psychological health later on,” said Dr. Robert
M. Brackbill, a CDC doctor working with the World Trade Center Health Registry,
which has been tracking the health of more than 71,000 people who worked at
ground zero or were in the area on Sept. 11.

Friday’s study drew from preliminary interviews with 8,418 adults in the registry
who escaped from the twin towers, the collapsed Seven World Trade Center and
more than 30 buildings that suffered extensive damage on Sept. 11. More than
70 percent escaped from the twin towers.

The interviews took place more than two years after the attacks, between Sept.
5, 2003, and Nov. 20, 2004, and did not involve medical examinations. Follow-up
surveys are planned this month.

“We are just beginning to learn about the health effects of the worst
day in New York City’s history,” said Daniel Slippen, a survivor of the
attacks and a member of the registry’s community advisory board. “It is
critical to know whether these physical and mental effects will continue, diminish
or grow worse over time.”

City officials in charge of the registry say it will likely take 20 years or
more to determine whether 9/11 exposure led to increased cancer deaths or illnesses
among survivors.

The study said more than six in 10 were caught in the clouds of trade center
dust that enveloped the area. Those people were nearly three times as likely
to have respiratory problems, 40 percent more likely to experience severe psychological
problems and five times more likely to report suffering a stroke, Brackbill
said.

More than 56 percent of the survivors said they had new or worsening respiratory
ailments, including sinus problems, shortness of breath and a persistent cough.
More than 43 percent sustained a physical injury on Sept. 11; the most common
were eye injuries.

Almost all of the people studied witnessed at least three events likely to
cause psychological trauma, such as the collapse of the towers, the deaths or
injuries of others or people jumping from the twin towers, the study said.

More than 64 percent of the survivors said they were depressed, anxious or
had other emotional problems, and nearly 11 percent were in severe psychological
distress at the time of their interview, the study said.

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may
not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

(c) 2006 MSNBC.com


Policeman’s death linked to post-9/11 work

Respiratory failure due to toxic exposure killed 34-year-old, autopsy finds

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12283795/

April 12, 2006

NEW YORK – The death of a 34-year-old detective who developed respiratory disease
after working at ground zero is directly related to the Sept. 11 attacks, a
coroner said in the first known ruling that attributes a death to recovery work
at the World Trade Center site.

James Zadroga’s family and union released his autopsy results Tuesday,
saying they are proof of the first death of a city police officer related to
the response effort after the terrorist attacks.

“It is felt with a reasonable degree of medical certainty that the cause
of death in this case was directly related to the 9/11 incident,” wrote
Gerard Breton, a pathologist at the Ocean County (N.J.) medical examiner’s
office.

Zadroga, of Little Egg Harbor, N.J., died in January of respiratory failure
and had inflammation in his lung tissue due to “a history of exposure
to toxic fumes and dust,” Breton wrote.

The detective spent 470 hours after the attacks sifting through the twin towers’
smoldering ruins, wearing a paper mask for protection. His breathing became
labored within weeks; he developed a cough and he had to use an oxygen tank
to breathe. He retired on disability in November 2004.

The coroner found material “consistent with dust” in Zadroga’s
lungs and damage to his liver and said his heart and spleen were enlarged.

1 million tons of debris

Zadroga’s parents and 4-year-old daughter appeared at a news conference
with half a dozen other detectives who said they have suffered from cancer,
strokes, lung disease and other ailments because of post-Sept. 11 work at the
trade center site.

A class action lawsuit and families of ground zero workers have alleged more
than two dozen deaths are related to exposure to trade center dust, which doctors
believe contained a number of toxic chemicals including asbestos and more than
1 million tons of tower debris.

“They all knew it was detrimental to their health,” said Joseph
Zadroga, the detective’s father. “They all knew that, yet they stayed
there.”

Doctors running health screening programs, including a city registry following
tens of thousands of people, say it will take decades to assess the health effects
of working at the trade center site.

(c) 2006 The Associated Press(c) 2006 MSNBC.com


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