Browse by Category
Graphic image for 9/11 foreknowledge
Graphic: unanswered questions
Graphic of paper shredder- destruction of evidence
Graphic: conflict of interest
Cui bono graphic
Alleged Hijacker graphic
9/11 Commission Shield

History Commons New 9/11 Timeline Entries

CleanPrintBtn gray smallPdfBtn gray smallEmailBtn gray small

August 9, 2012
New 9/11 Timeline Entries: Hijacking Exercises, Air Force One’s Movements, Laura Bush on Sept. 11, and More
HistoryCommons.org

History Commons is only halfway towards its summer fundraising goal. Please contribute generously to help the History Commons stay alive and functioning.

A large number of entries have been added to the Complete 9/11 Timeline at History Commons, most of which provide new details about the events of the day of September 11, 2001.

Other entries are being posted in the US Civil Liberties project on campaign finance, voting laws, and indefinite detentions.

New 9/11 Entries

One new timeline entry describes a training exercise based on the scenario of a possible terrorist attack that was run on the morning of September 11 by the US Coast Guard in Tampa Bay, Florida, quite close to Sarasota, where the president was at the time. Another entry deals with a meeting scheduled to take place at the Pentagon that morning, regarding a planned “disaster exercise” at the nearby Navy Annex building.

An entry reveals that a number of FBI agents had, for reasons that are unknown, already arrived at the Navy Annex when the Pentagon was hit. Later on, the Navy set up a new command center at the Navy Annex, after its original command center was destroyed in the Pentagon attack.

Several entries describe the futile attempts of intelligence officers at NORAD’s Northeast Air Defense Sector (NEADS) to obtain information about the first hijacking. After learning of the hijacking, a NEADS intelligence officer called the FBI’s Strategic Information and Operations Center and the National Military Joint Intelligence Center at the Pentagon, but neither of them could provide any information. Searches on the SIPRNET–the US military Internet system–also revealed nothing. Furthermore, the threat briefing at NEADS that morning had included no indication of an increase in the terrorist threat level.

Some NEADS personnel have said they were monitoring Flight 93 long before the time at which the 9/11 Commission concluded the military was first alerted to this hijacked aircraft. Also, a commander at NEADS complained that an officer from the NEADS battle cab had come down to the operations floor, where he had been “circumventing my system.” What is more, NEADS personnel only learned that the president’s plane, Air Force One, was airborne about half an hour after it took off from Sarasota.

New entries describe in detail the actions of Laura Bush, the first lady, on September 11. Laura Bush learned of the first crash in New York as she was about to leave the White House and go to Capitol Hill, to attend a hearing there. When her limousine drove off from the White House, she was unaware that a second plane had hit the World Trade Center minutes earlier. She only learned of this second crash just before she reached Capitol Hill.

When she arrived on Capitol Hill, Laura Bush initially spent time with Senator Edward Kennedy in his office. However, her arrival apparently did not lead to any increase in the level of security. She was even allowed to make an appearance before the press, which was shown live on television. But a reporter who attended the appearance was subsequently warned to stay away from the windows of the building, because it was thought that a suspicious aircraft was heading in their direction.

Continued at source: Complete 911 Timeline at HistoryCommons.org.

Thank you so much for your support!

“For serious research, it’s hard to think of a more valuable resource than the timelines assembled by History Commons. The material they provide is a welcome antidote to the misinformation and disinformation that has been coming out of Washington in recent years and they are essential tools in assembling a counter-narrative that more honestly addresses the crises we face.” — author Craig Unger

The History Commons provides “a richly documented summary of [the Watergate] events.” — Salon columnist Glenn Greenwald

“Any researcher, reporter or scholar with an interest in the war on terror would consider the [History Commons] timelines a bonanza of open source information.” — Peter Lance

“The [History Commons] researchers are in many ways similar to the team Scott Armstrong, the former Washington Post reporter, recruited in the mid-1980s to uncover the roots of Reagan’s secret Iran-Contra deals.” — columnist James Ridgway

“The History Commons is one of the most important and technologically advanced projects of civil journalism there is today.” — Daniel Erlacher, founder of Austria’s Elevate Festival

“Endlessly informative.” — reporter Steve Perry

Participating in HC:
Supporters of History Commons at Facebook: http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997935&s=74647663
History Commons on Twitter: @historycommons http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997936&s=74647663
Update your email address: http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997937&s=74647663
Donate to the History Commons: http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997938&s=74647663
Come write for the History Commons: http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997939&s=74647663
Contact us: hc AT historycommons DOT org
Unsubscribe: http://srv.ezinedirector.net/?n=5997940&s=74647663